Skip to main content
Northern Queensland Regional Training Hubs
Northern Queensland Regional Training Hubs

Discover training in Northern Queensland

Training Opportunities

Announcement

The Round Up: A Medical Podcast

Join Dr Elissa Hatherly for a north Queensland-based medical podcast offering local content for local clinicians. Listeners will hear from passionate and knowledgeable clinicians discussing the approach and management of a diverse range of medical topics significant to our communities.

Learn More

A network of medical training opportunities

We connect medical students, interns and junior doctors with resources and opportunities to prepare for specialist training and beyond, creating stronger health outcomes in our region.

Dr Tadiwa Mashavave, Junior Doctor, Mackay Base Hospital

Dr Tadiwa Mashavave, Junior Doctor, Mackay Base Hospital

“It was during my time at JCU that I decided I wanted to end up somewhere rural or regional and I thought I would be able to gain a lot of hands-on skills in my junior years at a regional hospital like Mackay Base Hospital. It’s been great working with other doctors who are as passionate about rural health and the people it serves.”
Dr Hannah Bennett, Rural Generalist and Pain Specialist, Townsville University Hospital

Dr Hannah Bennett, Rural Generalist and Pain Specialist, Townsville University Hospital

"As a consultant in Pain Medicine, I have excellent work-life balance. Townsville is a great place to raise a family and there's so much on your doorstep here. It's just an easy life.” Read More
Dr Anthony Brazzale, Cardiologist, Cairns and Hinterland Hospital and Health Service

Dr Anthony Brazzale, Cardiologist, Cairns and Hinterland Hospital and Health Service

“We have advanced trainees who come from Brisbane and want to come back here now as consultants. They tell us this is one of the best training centres in Australia. The opportunities you get up here, you’ll get nowhere else.” Read More

Keep up to date with our latest news & events!

Join our mailing list

News Feed

View All
Specialty spotlight: Rural generalist medicine

30 November 2022

Specialty spotlight: Rural generalist medicine

For Dr Helen Fraser, rural generalism has not only offered diverse and challenging medicine, it’s also been an opportunity to champion health equity for rural hospitals and take a clinical leadership role for the region. Senior Medical Officer (SMO) at Ayr Hospital for the past six years, Dr Fraser chairs the Townsville Hospital and Health Service Clinical Council, which gives clinical staff a voice in the management of the region’s health service. Dr Fraser grew up on a farm between Hamilton and Warrnambool in southwest Victoria. “Some of my friends’ parents were the doctors in town and they practised rural generalism before it was known as rural generalism. They were the people who I really looked up to at that time.” After graduating from James Cook University in 2012, she stayed in Townsville for her intern and Registered Medical Officer (RMO) years and completed advanced skills in emergency medicine and anaesthetics before taking up an SMO role in Ayr, 88km to the city’s south. “As a rural generalist in Ayr with advanced skills, we're using all of those emergency medicine skills and then we're using internal medicine skills because we look after everyone on the ward,” Dr Fraser says. “I use my anaesthetic advanced skill for emergency presentations with imminent airway risk, but also with our obstetric deliveries and providing epidurals after hours. We do a lot of gastroenterology procedures, and going forward, we're hoping that more surgery will be performed in Ayr.” Life as a rural generalist The National Rural Health Commissioner, Adjunct Professor Ruth Stewart, and trainee rural generalist Dr Preston Cardelli, a JCU graduate, talk about the rewards and rich experiences of rural generalism.

Read More
Tackling health at population level

28 November 2022

Tackling health at population level

JCU GP registrar Dr Jay Short has been part of North Queensland’s public health response to everything from COVID-19 to monkeypox, bat bites, melioidosis, meningococcal disease, diphtheria, Hendra virus and Japanese encephalitis in 2022. In December, Dr Short becomes the first Australian College of Rural and Remote Medicine (ACRRM) registrar to complete Advanced Specialised Training in population health in Townsville. Dr Short worked as a remote area nurse across Australia for 13 years before completing his medical degree at James Cook University in 2018. His deep knowledge of the region’s remote Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities has proved invaluable for the Townsville Public Health Unit, which manages multiple disease outbreaks concurrently across a vast area. Dr Short’s JCU supervisor, public health physician Dr Nishila Moodley, draws an analogy between public health specialists and the sci-fi secret agents of the Men in Black films. While the COVID-19 pandemic has elevated the specialty’s profile, much of their work still goes under the radar. “If we do our job correctly, no one knows we're there. That's why people don't know who we are. I always tell them, we're like the Men in Black,” says Dr Moodley. “In Townsville, we've never really had an alpha or beta COVID-19 outbreak because we had responded clinically to those individual cases so rapidly that infection didn't get a chance to establish itself here.”

Read More
An intern’s top 3 tips for medical students

22 November 2022

An intern’s top 3 tips for medical students

Internship at Townsville University Hospital has been a first-rate training ground for aspiring rural generalist Dr Harjyot Gill. Dr Gill looks back on her first year as a doctor, her med school experience at James Cook University (JCU) and gives her top three tips for med students: “Internship is very exciting. Finally, you've made it, you're a doctor and you get to go to work and make a real difference to people’s lives each day.” “My first term was in ED, which was a great experience because you work up a patient from the very beginning. I found the emergency department offers a great opportunity to round out your knowledge and skills whilst rapidly assessing and treating undifferentiated patients in a time-critical manner. “My second term was in Charters Towers, as I'm currently on the prevocational pathway for rural generalism. My time in Charters Towers was probably the best so far. I was rounding on patients myself, discussing management plans with my supervisors and with their feedback I would enact the plan. “The type of experience or exposure I had in Charters Towers is unheard of in a tertiary setting. In rural communities you're doing a lot more, which allows you to develop your clinical decision-making skills. I felt like my knowledge and skills were growing exponentially as I was making my own decisions but in a very supportive clinical environment where the senior doctors were always there to guide me. “My third term was my surgical term, in gynaecology. My clinical elective in sixth year was also in gynaecology at Townsville University Hospital. The only difference was now as an intern I was getting paid to do all the things I loved as a medical student. I was assisting in theatre, seeing patients in clinics and on some occasions witnessing the magic of childbirth. It felt like I just picked up from where I had left off as a medical student in sixth year. “I’m currently on paediatrics. This is just a short elective for five weeks, and every second week I'm rostered on to baby checks. So just this morning, I was examining babies and squeezing in a couple of cuddles here and there, which always warms my heart. “Essentially, at this stage, I'm trying to complete all the prerequisites for the rural generalist pathway. Next year, I'll be rotating through obstetrics, anaesthetics, emergency medicine as well as another rural term and a relieving term. Beyond that, I'll be planning to apply to one of the GP colleges, whether it's ACRRM or RACGP, and deciding on an advanced skill I would like to specialise in. “Ultimately I see myself in a rural community with women’s health as a part of my practice. I would love to be a part of a community, and I feel like in smaller hospitals, you're able to know everyone in the team. In Charters Towers, by my third week I knew everyone in the hospital; I knew who was on the wards, I knew who was in admin, and who was in the kitchen.”

Read More
Reaching for balance with a passion outside medicine

10 October 2022

Reaching for balance with a passion outside medicine

Obstetrician and gynaecologist Dr Tiarna Ernst has a high-flying perspective on finding life balance, having trained in tandem as both a professional athlete and doctor. The 2011 James Cook University graduate, who grew up in Cape York, was drafted into the inaugural AFLW competition in 2016, winning a premiership with the Western Bulldogs in 2018 and continuing to play elite sport throughout her medical specialty training. “I knew for me, running out on to the football field was almost therapeutic and that I could switch off from the pressures associated with being a junior doctor,” Dr Ernst says. “I could just be a player and it didn't matter what I did outside of playing footy. I think that can be transferred into any area of interest; it doesn't need to be sport.” Dr Ernst will deliver the keynote closing address at the AMA Queensland Junior Doctor Conference, which is supported by NQRTH.  She will talk about how to find purpose and passion outside of medicine. “My message for junior doctors to find something, whatever it is, outside of medicine that gives you balance in your life,” Dr Ernst says. “I think you need to find a passion. It doesn't need to be sport. It doesn't need to be physical. It could be analytical, it could be academic, but it needs to be something different outside of medicine. It needs to be something where you can switch off, you can forget that you're a doctor or a medical student, and just pour your energy into that thing. “I've got some colleagues who are very interested in music, others are interested in volunteering groups, climate change, things like that.”

Read More

The NQRTH medical training network:

NQRTH is an initiative of the Australian Government's Integrated Rural Training Pipeline (IRTP) and is facilitated by James Cook University in partnership with public and private hospitals, Queensland Aboriginal and Islander Health Council (QAIHC), health services, Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Organisations (ACCHOs) and GP clinics.

Cairns region
(07) 4226 8187

Central West region
(07) 4764 1547

Mackay region
(07) 4885 7122

North West region
(07) 4764 1547

Torres and Cape region
(07) 4095 6103

Townsville region
(07) 4781 3424